I’ve been thinking recently about what this global pandemic is teaching us. There are so many lessons, and I’m sure it will be years before we have any kind of integrated or final learnings.

But in the meantime, I think it is important to keep in mind that we ARE learning things. We are learning that some of the most vital work in a time of crisis, is also some of the least-well-compensated in times of normalcy. We are learning that small kindnesses are actually pretty humungous in impact. We are learning how desperately we need creative people – to make us laugh, to bring us hope, to share the healing beauty of art, music and theatre.

There is so much to learn. And I find that one of the things that helps me make it through these strange days, is finding meaning and collecting lessons that this pandemic is teaching.

I dearly hope that this is true:

The beautiful thing is that we have the power to make it true! We have the power to make choices to love harder – even before all of this is over. Let’s choose to do so! Let’s live wisely, as Jesus would have us do!

And along these same lines, I have always appreciated the insight and wisdom of Brené Brown, professor at University of Houston, who studies vulnerability, courage, shame and empathy. Her work has been formative for me. Her Netflix Special, the call to courage, is worth watching – it will make you laugh, it might make you cry, and it will certainly help you clarify some things about how you relate to the world and to others. She has done various Ted Talks and other appearances which are available on her website (click on her name, above to explore more about her).

So I really appreciated this thought from her:

You may have your own lessons and observations. Why not keep a journal (if you’re not the pen-and-paper journalling type, you might keep a blog or a note on your phone or some other way of collecting your thoughts) of these things as the days and weeks progress?

I’m convinced that humans are meaning-makers. We seek to understand our experiences, to learn and grow from them. And I’m convinced that making meaning from our challenges and difficulties (when we are ready to do so, and it’s ok to not be ready yet!), is good for our souls.

Until tomorrow, dear friends. Stay kind, stay safe!